IMG_1747Have you ever run a marathon in your life? There are usually two answers to this question, depending on the person. One answer might be, “Yes, I have run one or multiple marathons and I can’t wait to run another!” The second answer might be, “Are you crazy? Why would I willingly put my body through the stress and pain of running 26.2 miles?!” The running community tends to be a strong, goal oriented group of people with Type-A personalities who love to challenge themselves in a physical sense, learning to push their body to its limits. Although running (or endurance training) is not suited for everyone, it is my preferred “vice.” Running helps me to clear my mind of worry or anxiety that I may feel towards the future or unknown. It allows me to release my stress and float on my “runners high,” knowing and trusting that everything will work out the way it is supposed to and everything happens for a reason. Many people have never experienced this runners high, however once you do, I promise you will never want to go back. I strongly encourage a long run or two and then you can let me know how you feel afterwards. I’ve never heard anyone say, “I regret going on that run.” It’s even better if you live in a climate where you can run outdoors. I love being outdoors and running along the mountain trails or alongside the ocean at the beach. The photo above is of me 1 day before the LA Marathon 2015 – excited and ready to take on the challenge. 

 

IMG_1696I ran varsity Cross Country and Track in high school, but never committed to any races longer than a 10K after that. In November 2014, I was selected among hundreds of applicants to be a part of Team Nutribullet to run and train for the LA Marathon 2015 stadium to sea. I was so excited and committed myself to putting my energy and focus into training and running my first marathon.

Over the next 5 months, we trained as a team with weekly speed training drills and long distance runs over the weekend (starting at 5 miles and increasing all the way to 24 miles towards the end of training). Speed training was at night during the week and endurance training was every weekend early in the morning, along with additional 5-10 mile runs we were required to do on our own time during the week. Strength training was also encouraged at least 2 times per week, as well as a yoga or pilates 1 time per week (flexibility and stretching class). This training schedule required discipline, strength, perseverance and so much more. Eating properly and adequate sleep are two key factors in maintaining a healthy, injury free body. This photo describes what marathon training consists of, in a nutrition facts style format. I love this!

 

As a Registered Dietitian, I know how to nourish and fuel my body properly. However, when you are training for a marathon, it is difficult to keep up with the high calorie requirements because your body is burning so much more fuel throughout the day. I highly recommend small, frequent meals because you will be hungry every 2-3 hours anyways, and overconsumption of high density foods can lead to weight gain (even with marathon training). Sometimes people overestimate the calories that are burned during a workout, and therefore consume more calories (i.e. pizza, double cheeseburger, etc.). You can treat yourself here and there (in moderation), but let’s not overdo it. Staying fueled properly throughout the day is important to maintain your lean muscle mass. Do not make the mistake of “packing too many calories in” only around your workout (in the afternoon for example) because this will lead to increased body fat composition (the opposite of what you want as an athlete or marathon runner). Here is an example of my nutrient consumption during marathon training:

 

IMG_1691Breakfast: Greens protein shake (i.e. 1 cup spinach or kale, 1 cup mixed organic berries, ½ banana, 1 tangerine, 1 scoop plant based protein powder, 1 tbsp. hemp seeds, 1 tbsp. raw unsalted almond butter, 1 tsp. cinnamon and 6-8 ounces of unsweetened almond or coconut milk.

 

IMG_1481Mid morning snack: Steel cut oatmeal (1/2 cup dry or 1 cup cooked) with ½ cup organic strawberries, ¼ cup raw unsalted walnuts or almonds, 1 tsp. cinnamon (cooked in water or unsweetened almond or coconut milk).

 

Lunch: Grilled chicken sandwich: 3 ounces of boneless, skinless chicken breast on 100% whole wheat bread or Eziekel 4:9 bread (or gluten free bread if needed), with ½ of an avocado, spinach leaves, chopped veggies (i.e. onion, cucumber, tomato), and 1 tbsp. hummus or mustard spread.

Read More...

IMG_4848I hope you are all off to a great start to the New Year, and are now enjoying the beginning of “Fit February.” I know it is difficult to maintain a slender figure over the holidays with all of the temptations around and indulgences. Research shows the people tend to gain about 5 pounds on average over the holidays between the consumption of more alcohol (wine and more wine), heavy rich meals that are eaten later in the evening (dining out), and sweets (cakes, cookies, pies, etc.). Some of the overconsumption of foods can be due to mindless eating as well, which occurs when we as consumers, are distracted and not paying attention to what we are putting into our mouths. For example, when we are snacking on a bag of chips or a large bowl of salted nuts and chocolates while watching a movie, we may lose track of how much we’ve eaten. Remember that every bite counts!

The above photo is a snap shot of a nutrient packed lunch (or dinner option) that is filled with variety (color) and moderation (portion control) and is a great example of how to balance a healthy meal. It includes 1 cup of low sodium tomato basil soup, a spinach and veggie side salad with 1/2 of a 100% whole wheat English Muffin with 1/4 of an avocado on top, and a few spicy soy flaxseed chips with salsa for added crunch and metabolism boost.

 

January is the most popular time when people want a fresh start and decide to make their “New Years Resolutions” to lose weight, eat healthier, and exercise more. However, many of the resolutions that are made are unrealistic such as “I want to lose 15 pounds this month.” When the goals are not achieved, people feel a sense of failure and want to “throw in the towel.” This is the wrong approach.

 

IMG_4787I encourage you to set S.M.A.R.T. goals (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and can be achieved in the time frame you desire). An example of a more reasonable SMART goal (or New Years Resolution) for the average person would be to eat a balanced breakfast within an hour of waking up daily, pack and bring a balanced healthy lunch to work and exercise 3 times per week for 30 minutes. Diets don’t work. However, making nutrition and fitness part of your every life lifestyle does work!

 

Super bowl Sunday is just around the corner, and similar to the holidays, it can bring on mindless eating behavior and overconsumption of unhealthy foods. Research shows that people consume up to 6,000 calories on Super bowl Sunday. That’s more than people eat over a 3-day period of time!

 

Consider the usual menu: lots of beer, loaded nachos, chicken wings, chips, pizza, sugary soda, burgers, cookies and more beer! A fit person can burn up to 500 calories an hour while running on the treadmill. This means that you would have to exercise at this moderate to high intensity for 12 hours just to burn off the 6,000 calories you consumed in one day.

Read More...

IMG_4558

 

It’s Fall, which means “pumpkin everything” around here. Even if the weather outside does not feel like fall, it is still fun to get into the holiday spirit and embrace the changing of the seasons. There are many different recipes and treats that include pumpkin, however I wanted to bring a little something different to your table. It’s my job as a Registered Dietitian to encourage balanced eating and give you healthy substitutions for foods in recipes to increase the nutrient density, fiber, and decrease the saturated and trans fat (bad fats). These moist, healthy pumpkin muffins are one of my favorites! Give them a try!

 

Preparation Time: ~25 minutes

Cooking Time: ~20-25 minutes

IMG_4551

Ingredients:

  • 1 can pumpkin
  • 1 cup nonfat (or low fat) plain Greek yogurt
  • 3 egg whites
  • 1 egg (cage free, omega 3)
  • 1 ¾ cup quick cook steel cut oats (Trader Joe’s) or gluten free oats
  • ¼ cup Plant Fusion protein powder (or 100% natural whey protein is fine also)
  • ¼ cup organic coconut sugar (healthier version than cane sugar)
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds (optional)

 

Add- In’s:

  • ¼ cup raisins
  • ¼ cup chopped walnuts or pecans
  • Unsweetened shaved coconut (to top the muffins off with)

IMG_4554

 

Directions:

  1. Combine all of the dry ingredients into a bowl.
  2. Combine all of the wet ingredients into another bowl.
  3. Make a well in the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the dry.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  5. Line 12-cup muffin pan with cupcake liners or spray with coconut oil nonstick spray.
  6. Divide the mixture evenly among the muffin tins, and place into the pre-heated oven.
  7. Bake for 20 minutes or until tops are lightly golden brown.
  8. Cool muffins for about 5 minutes before removing from pan.
  9. Enjoy!!
Read More...

 

IMG_3818

Everyone travels…whether it’s for business, pleasure, a much needed vacation or a spontaneous weekend away. At some point, we all depart from the comfort of our own homes. It could be a quick trip to the next town for a business conference or it could be a 3-month backpacking trip halfway around the world! No matter what type of travel it is, there is one thing that is certain; our normal routines get thrown out the window making it difficult to stay fit and healthy while traveling.

 

If you usually work out in a gym, you might not have access to any equipment or machines. If you usually take long adventurous runs in your neighborhood, suddenly you no longer have a familiar route to follow. If you usually prepare your own meals, you suddenly may not have access to a kitchen or fridge. Your regular sleep patterns are usually thrown off because from taking a red eye or landing in a different time zone. When we travel, nothing is familiar which again makes it difficult to have any sort of routine. But, stay positive! I have some great tips to keep you healthy and fit while on the road.

 

I am here to encourage you that you CAN make exercise and eating healthy part of your “travel routine,” but it just takes a little bit of planning ahead. I know it is difficult to plan oftentimes because much of it is out of your control when we are traveling. However, here are a few of the tips that I use when I travel:

 

IMG_2087_2Rule #1: Pack snacks for the airport/plane

Your flight might be delayed, or you might be sitting on the runway while something is being checked out… and when hunger calls, you need to answer. The food in the airport and on the plane is usually packed with added calories, preservatives, sodium and fat; which can pack on the pounds quickly if you travel regularly.

 

Snack ideas:

  • Raw, unsalted nuts (almonds, walnuts, cashews, pecans, pistachios, Brazil nuts, etc.) You can make your own trail mix by mixing 2-3 of these nuts with dried cranberries, raisins or figs. Eat about ¼ cup serving at a time.
  • Tosi super bites (with chia and flaxseeds – great source of anti inflammatory omega 3 fatty acid)
  • High fiber cereal (eat ½-1 cup, dry in a zip lock bag). Crunchy cereals that are high fiber, low sugar and contain some protein are a great option (i.e. Kashi Go Lean, Kashi Crunch, Kashi Heart to Heart, Nature’s Path Flax plus, etc.)
  • Turkey’s jerky, salmon jerky or beef jerky (I like the Trader Joe’s brands because they contain no nitrates, no preservatives, MSG, no artificial colors or ingredients).
  • Whole wheat pretzel thins
  • Kale chips (I highly recommend making your own if possible because many of the store options contain added cheese, salt and fat)
  • Dry packaged plain oatmeal (you can always add hot water to this in your hotel room and have it for breakfast or as a snack)
  • Portable fruit (if you’re able to fly with it) such as apple, pear, peach, banana, orange, pluot, tangerine, etc.
  • Granola/Protein Bar: Think thin, KIND Nuts and Spices, STRONG and KIND, Luna Protein, Lara bars, Go Macro bars, etc. These bars are lower in sugar, higher in protein, and lower in saturated fat (the unhealthy fat) then most of the other bars out there.
Read More...

SaladFebruary is American Heart Month and I’d like to focus on bringing awareness to heart disease and how you can prevent it. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease. The good news is that is can be prevented by making healthy lifestyle choices – focused around diet and exercise. That is why I am here as your Registered Dietitian and Certified Personal Trainer to help sort out the facts versus myths regarding nutrition and fitness and get you on the right track!

 

Here are a few ways to lower your risk:

1. Get Your Annual Doctor Evaluation: I highly recommend going to see your doctor for an annual check up, where you can get your labs drawn, and “know your numbers.” You might feel okay, but your labs will indicate that your LDL (low density lipoprotein or bad cholesterol) and triglycerides are extremely high, which will put you at greater risk of heart disease. You will not know until you get your labs checked.

Lab goals:

  • Cholesterol <200 mg/dL
  • LDL (bad cholesterol) <100 mg/dL
  • HDL (good cholesterol) >60 mg/dL
  • Triglycerides <150 mg/dL
  • Blood pressure 120/80

Note* LDL (bad cholesterol) and triglycerides are increased by foods that are high in saturated fat, and trans fat. Your Blood pressure is affected by mostly by sodium intake.

 

Make it a goal to consume <7% of total calories from saturated fat and preferably no trans fat (this is added to many processed foods for increased shelf life, preservation). Eating fresh food is always best. Make it a goal to consume approximately 2300 mg or less of sodium per day.

 

Fit2. Watch Your Weight:

Being overweight or obese can increase your risk of heart disease. A healthy body mass index (BMI) range is between 18-24. Please note, that BMI does not always apply to individuals with large muscle mass (i.e. athletes and body builders) because BMI does not take into account muscle mass. Therefore, if you have a large muscle mass, you may fall into the “overweight” category, which is not accurate. I recommend getting your body fat % tested for a more specific measure and better alternative for those who fit into this category.

Read More...

Holiday Oatmeal‘Tis the season to be jolly! It’s December and we are in the heart of holiday season, a time filled with love, joy, rich food and decadent desserts. We attend holiday parties with friends and dine out at some of our favorite restaurants with family and significant others. Weight gain is one thing that is feared the most during the holidays. Consumers have one (or a few) “bad day(s)” of eating and want to “throw in the towel,” which is the wrong approach! Life is about having balance, not about being perfect. We all have our own weaknesses to face and obstacles to overcome.

 

Finding a way to incorporate nutrition and exercise into your lifestyle presents a different challenge for each person, which is why I always provide customized nutrition and fitness consulting expertise to my clients. Every individual has his or her own food likes and dislikes, food allergies and/or dietary restrictions based on past medical or family medical history. No one is exactly alike, which is why each body is unique and requires different nutrients and proportions. You should never compare yourself, and following the latest “diet trend” will not solve your problems. It is about learning what nutrients your body needs, and how to incorporate them into your daily lifestyle. You’re in for a treat because this month I have a challenge for you! It’s called the Holiday Challenge to “Eat Smart, Burn More and Maintain Balance. My challenge is focused on lifestyle as a whole, not just the eating component. It includes the following:

 

Make ½ your grains whole: Make sure at least ½ of the carbohydrates you’re consuming are high in fiber (>3 grams of fiber per serving). Fiber is important for healthy digestion, regular bowel movements, reducing bloating, maintaining good blood sugar control and increasing satiety (which can help you maintain or lose weight).

 

Sleep at least 7 hours per night: Lack of sleep can contribute to depression and increase rate of aging. When our bodies don’t get enough sleep, we produce more of the stress hormone called Cortisol, which can increase abdominal adiposity. Shortened sleep time is associated with decreases in leptin (a hormone that signals satiety) and elevations in ghrelin (a hormone that stimulates hunger). Your cravings will be revved up for high fat, high carbohydrate foods due to this shift in hormones. Our brain does not function as well with a lack of sleep, therefore we do not have the “mental strength” to make healthy food choices. For example, if we are presented with an option of a donut or veggies with hummus for a snack, consumers will be more likely choose the donut if they are sleep deprived.

 

IMG_7856Fit physical activity into your day: Goal of 30 minutes of activity 4 times per week (at least). If you are advanced and exercise at a high intensity on a regular basis, than 1 hour of physical activity 5 times per week is a good goal. I realize that we all have very busy schedules, which are even more compacted during the busy holiday time. However, we can’t make excuses everyday. I love the saying, “It’s not about having the time, it’s about MAKING the time.” We need to be strong and get it done! I encourage you to set goals, create a support system and grab a workout buddy to hold yourself accountable. Find a sport or activity that you enjoy, and make it fun, instead of a chore.

 

Read More...

 

KIND 2Have you tried the new STRONG & KIND protein bars? I had the pleasure of working with KIND to assess the nutritional health benefits and breakdown of these bars, long before they were out in stores. It was fun coming across them at Trader Joe’s this week while doing my weekly grocery shopping. They were pleasantly displayed front and center at the check out register. The STRONG and KIND protein bar is very unique because it is gluten free, non-GMO (genetically modified organism), low glycemic index, high fiber and high in protein, but does not contain any whey or soy (which is the primary protein source used in many protein/snack bars on the market). You might be wondering where the protein is coming from.  Well, KIND always sticks with it’s motto of adding whole, natural ingredients that you can see and pronounce, and along with it’s natural source of protein (nuts and seeds), KIND has added a well balanced plant based pea protein.

 

Pea ProteinBenefits of pea protein:

  • Hypoallergenic: many people develop intolerances to whey or soy protein over time, resulting in a bloated, uncomfortable feeling and other stomach issues
  • High in BCAA (branched chain amino acids) which aid in muscle building, decreased body fat and increased satiety, and energy during workouts
  • 100% vegan (plant based with no added ingredients), gluten free

 

 

The STRONG and KIND protein bar  provides a bold and savory taste versus the sweet taste (coming from yogurt or dried fruit) found in other KIND bar varieties. I tasted the roasted jalapeno, and the honey smoked BBQ varieties and loved them! It is a great pre workout snack or travel nutrition (on the go) for people of all ages and gender.

 

KIND 3There are so many protein bars and snack bars on the market, which makes it very difficult for consumers to know which one to buy. The problem with many of the snack and protein bars on the market is that they are high in saturated fat, which will contribute to increased LDL (bad cholesterol) and therefore increase your risk of heart disease. Other snack bars are too high in sugar, or processed ingredients such as preservatives or fillers for longer shelf life. If a product is lower in sugar, then it is usually higher in salt (i.e. take out one poison and replace it with another).

 

The reason I love KIND is that is always stays true to it’s motto of using ingredients that are natural, that you can see and pronounce. They work hard to find a perfect blend of low sugar, low salt, high fiber and low fat (saturated fat) and include heart healthy monounsatured fats.

Read More...

 

IMG_0287Have you tried a juice cleanse before? Over the weekend, I decided to get adventurous with Juice Crafters, and try their 1 day “Master Cleanse.” This cleanse is designed to improve your day-to-day health and help your body eliminate toxins while replacing them with powerful nutrients. It consists of 8 cold pressed, raw juices each containing unique and beneficial ingredients to detox, improve health, enhance beauty, increase energy and immune function. The goal is to drink one juice every two hours and drink about 6-8 cups of water throughout the day in between juices. The order in which you drink the juices is also very important. Juice Crafters gave me a reminder sheet with the juices listed in the order to be consumed.

 

As a Registered Dietitian, I see many clients who ask about “cleansing” and “detox” juice blends. Usually my clients are inclined to ask about these after a stink of traveling, unhealthy eating and drinking, dining out or recent weight gain. My answer to them is that our bodies are equipt with all of the necessary organs to detoxify, such as the liver, kidneys and lungs. However, because these organs are working around the clock, day in and day out, (somedays more than others depending on what you ate and drank) it is nice to give them a break once in a while. A 1-3 day juice cleanse that is packed with nutrients is the best way to do it! Please note that I don’t recommend doing the old “lemon, honey, water and cayenne pepper cleanse” that people have been doing for years to gain quick weight loss results because it will deplete your body of nutrients and lead to dehydration.

 

Juice Crafters on the other hand, is a great way to hit the “reset” button on your digestive tract and organs, and allow your body to filter many of the toxins that could have been lingering in your body for quite some time. Most people are aware that fruits and vegetables are “good for you.” However, I am here to explain the health benefits of each juice based on their ingredients. Each one of the juices contains a rich source of fiber, which helps keep you full and promotes a healthy and regular digestive tract.

 

  1. IMG_0288Greenest #3: consists of spinach, kale, romaine, cucumber, parsley, celery, lemon, apple and ginger.

RD insight:

  • Green vegetables are one of the best types of foods to consume in the morning because you are coming from an overnight fast and need to balance blood sugar levels. These greens are specifically high in antioxidants which are cancer fighting, rich in calcium, fiber, Vitamin K, C, A, B, iron, folate, magnesium, and omega 3 fatty acids (important for brain function).
  • The lemon helps the body become more alkaline (balanced) and can also enhance the absorpotion of iron (from leafy green vegetables) in the body which is important for red blood cell formation that deliver oxygen to the body’s tissues.
  • The apple provides soluble fiber which will help lower LDL (bad cholesterol) and reduce risk of heart disease while also providing a slighlty sweet taste but without any added sugar.
  • The ginger has a great anti-nausea effect, as well as anti-viral properties which helps boost immune function.

 

  1. IMG_0289Cleaner #10: consists of pineapple, apple, and mint.

RD insight:

  • Pineapple contains an important enzyme called bromelain which improves protein and nutrient digestion, reduces inflammation, prevents blood clotting and can help reduce swelling post surgery or reduce joint and muscle pain post injury.
  • The phytonutrients (plant nutrients) in apples can help regulate blood sugar which is especially important for anyone who is diabetic or pre-diabetic. Apples are also high in antioxidants which can prevent cancer (more specifically colon and breast cancer) and heart disease.
  • Mint helps to reduce inflammation, and activates the salivary glands in our mouth which secrete digestive enzymes to soothe the stomach and facilitate digestion. It is also used as a palate cleanser after the appetizer and before the main course. It is a stimulant which may help to increase weight loss, alertness and decrease fatigue.

At this point in the cleanse, I felt great! I felt energized, full and satisfied. Breakfast is my favorite meal of the day, and I didn’t feel like I was missing out this morning. Juice Crafters was providing me with all of the necessary nutrients to keep my mind and body running at full speed.

Read More...

Acai bowlWhat does it mean to “eat clean?” It is a buzz topic centered around the consumption of healthy, whole, unprocessed foods. We see so many different things in the media every day directing us on what to eat, and what not to eat. Nutrition is ever changing and evolving, with new studies and research out all of the time telling us what will help or hurt us nutrition wise. I am here as your go-to Registered Dietitian to separate theory and fact regarding nutritional benefits (or hazards) of foods.

 

Clean Eating dates back to the 1960’s but the lines of “wholesome” food have been blurred with the constant increase in processed snack foods that appear healthy from the front packaging but actually contain unhealthy ingredients when you read and dissect the nutrition facts label. Many companies try to make their foods appear as “whole” and “natural” to the consumer, when in reality, there is added sugar, salt or even trans fat to preserve the shelf life of the product. It is important to stay educated about these foods. I help my clients select nutrient packed foods to create balanced meals during my grocery store tours. They are always astonished to see what foods really pan out to be as good for you, as they appear from the front packaging.IMG_7072

Guidelines for clean eating:

  1. Choose whole, natural foods instead of processed foods – The majority of these foods should be fresh with no additives or preservatives. Red flags on the ingredients list include: high fructose corn syrup, partially or fully hydrogenated oils, and/or any dyes (food coloring).

  1. Eat small, frequent meals – Consuming 5-6 meals spread throughout the day can help you maintain or lose weight (lose fat mass and increase lean muscle), maintain good blood sugar control, boost metabolism, increase energy and mental focus/clarity during your work or school day.

  1. Incorporate balanced meals –  It is very important to include a lean protein, high fiber carbohydrate and heart healthy fat at every meal. Many people consume inadequate protein during their breakfast and lunch meals, and try to make up for it during dinner. This is the perfect example of when ¾ of your calories are consumed at 3pm or later and affects body composition, causing increased fat mass. Make sure to incorporate lean proteins with each meal to increase satiety, help with muscle maintenance or building and weight control.IMG_7070

Read More...

CerealThe summer has flown by too quickly and now it’s time for kids to go back to school! Parents are stocking up on school supplies to prepare their children with all the necessary tools they need for class. One thing that is often overlooked during the hustle and bustle of getting our kids off to school in the morning is making a balanced and healthy breakfast. It doesn’t have to be expensive or take a lot of preparation to be healthy. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day because it literally means “breaking” the “fast” and therefore it is crucial to fuel properly in the morning or else you will literally be “running on fumes” (low energy, no fuel).

 

Food that is healthy does not have to take on the stereotype of “tasting like cardboard.” Many parents will feed their children a glass of juice (approximately 20-35 grams of sugar per 8 ounce glass) paired with a choice of convenient breakfast food (i.e. Pop tart, donut, croissant, cinnamon roll or sugary cereal such as Fruit Loops, Lucky Charms, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch to name a few) which is a recipe for disaster. Many parents are unaware of the drastic effect that these foods have on blood sugar levels. These foods are packed with refined sugar and contain no nutritional value (i.e. fiber, vitamins or minerals). Excessive amounts of refined sugars are directly linked to weight gain, childhood obesity, hypertension, headaches, fatigue, Type 2 Diabetes, metabolic syndrome and acne.

 

IMG_2190Forbes stated that in 2012, Americans consumed about 130 pounds of sugar per year (equivalent to 765 grams of sugar or 191 teaspoons) and the number continues to rise. Americans consume 10 times more sugar than other food additives. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 9.5 teaspoons of sugar per day. The average adult consumes 22 teaspoons (88 grams) per day and the average child consumes 32 teaspoons (128 grams) per day. Sugar is highly addictive, so the more you have, the more you want. It is a vicious cycle that can be broken by making lifestyle behavior modifications and incorporating healthier foods and beverages on a regular basis.

 

There are so many healthy foods that children enjoy and believe to be delicious, but are not consumed often enough. It is just about being aware as a parent, doing your research and learning how to read a nutrition facts label. It is important to avoid all foods with high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and partially or fully hydrogenated oils (trans fats) and foods high is saturated fats. These unhealthy fats (i.e. trans and saturated fats) contribute to increasing LDL (bad cholesterol), clogging arteries and increasing heart rated conditions.

Read More...